Rack alternative for long drops?

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Re: Rack alternative for long drops?

Postby eyecave » Nov 14, 2016 10:01 pm

perfection:........conventional length titanium rack smallest diameter safely possible where the last possible bar's opposite end is positioned as close as possible to the rack's ear.........six lower titanium bars that are roughly triangularly shaped with thicker lower ends with a bit more flare...the upper four should be shaped like a convention hollow bar but smaller diameter......spacers may not be necessary....the triangular bars may provide more friction and certainly less effective heat dissipation.......

one inch or maybe even more shorter than conventional titanium rack with five titanium bars larger than normal.....if you ask me.......its an idiots middle ground from super, long, conventional, short, and shorter racks....where the idiots fear is a loss of control....
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Re: Rack alternative for long drops?

Postby CaverCarl » Jun 10, 2018 8:01 pm

Any device will get you down.
Do you want to struggle to feed it? For long drops if you want the ultimate in control of your speed, both at the top and (probably more important) at the bottom you want an open 6 bar rack. If you really want to enjoy the ride you invest in a specialized long frame open rack.
The Scarab will get you down but on long drops you work at it.
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Re: Rack alternative for long drops?

Postby bobby49 » Sep 29, 2018 1:23 am

Time for a little historical humor. Decades ago I was an assistant instructor in a U.S. Army rappelling school in South Korea. We taught _tactical_ rappelling, which used a minimum of equipment and a minimum of safety technique. Back in those days, all we had was the green Army equivalent of goldline (laid nylon rope), we used one steel non-locking carabiner, and a self-tied Swiss seat. We would go zinging down a 110-foot rope pretty fast. Then we would step off at the bottom. I would commonly forget and accidentally touch my right forearm to the hot carabiner. Yikes. I had a whole line of little burn scars on my arm. _Those_ were the days!
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Re: Rack alternative for long drops?

Postby trogman » Sep 29, 2018 11:45 am

bobby49 wrote:Time for a little historical humor. Decades ago I was an assistant instructor in a U.S. Army rappelling school in South Korea. We taught _tactical_ rappelling, which used a minimum of equipment and a minimum of safety technique. Back in those days, all we had was the green Army equivalent of goldline (laid nylon rope), we used one steel non-locking carabiner, and a self-tied Swiss seat. We would go zinging down a 110-foot rope pretty fast. Then we would step off at the bottom. I would commonly forget and accidentally touch my right forearm to the hot carabiner. Yikes. I had a whole line of little burn scars on my arm. _Those_ were the days!



:laughing:
I would have thought that the first time that happened you would've learned your lesson! :big grin:
I suppose I have no room to talk though. I've been known to be somewhat thick-headed about such things as well. Just the other day at work I grabbed a drill bit to change it out after I had just got done drilling a hole with it. Yea, it burned my stupid finger. :roll:

It's a wonder more Army guys didn't end up hurt or dead from the practices you describe. But, as you said, the goal was a minimum of equipment and safety in order to get the soldiers to their destination in a hurry.

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Re: Rack alternative for long drops?

Postby bobby49 » Sep 29, 2018 2:05 pm

During that one summer season, we trained thousands of infantry troops in this rappelling style, and we had only two injuries out of that. One injury was in one guy who had just been through jump school, so he was trained (there) to keep his feet together. Obviously in rappelling, you keep your feet apart for better balance. So, on his first bounce contact with the cliff, he leaned to one side, dislocating his shoulder. He was belayed, so he fell only a few feet. Our head instructor was demonstrating what he called his Zip Crash Boom method of getting off the cliff in a hurry. What he failed to consider was that it was raining and the laid rope was wet, so its friction was different. He zinged down most of the way to the bottom at terminal velocity and then did not slow down much before he impacted the ground. He was carted off to the dispensary. Apparently he had no broken bones, but he was not walking anywhere for two weeks. KIDS! This is only for trained professionals. Don't do this at home.
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