Some bats dew, some bats dew not. Why?

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Some bats dew, some bats dew not. Why?

Postby graveleye » Apr 7, 2007 10:02 am

That pretty much somes up my question. I got to thinking about it yesterday while caving when I would notice several bats all roosting/hibernating in the same area. Some would be completely dry, while a few feet away would be another that was completely covered with dew. I know this probably has something to do with their body temperature, but of course, I am not sure.
Anyone have an explanation for this?
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Re: Some bats dew, some bats dew not. Why?

Postby GypsumWolf » Apr 7, 2007 3:41 pm

graveleye wrote:That pretty much somes up my question. I got to thinking about it yesterday while caving when I would notice several bats all roosting/hibernating in the same area. Some would be completely dry, while a few feet away would be another that was completely covered with dew. I know this probably has something to do with their body temperature, but of course, I am not sure.
Anyone have an explanation for this?


Well, the bats around here have just got out of hibernation. They all don't get out of hibernation on the same day so the ones that have no dew have already flown since they got out of it already and the ones with dew have not woken up yet (because they get dew from being in one spot so long for hibernation).
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Postby Komebeaux » Apr 7, 2007 10:02 pm

It also has a lot to do with the characteristics of the species. Big Browns typically awaken multiple times during hibernation whereas Pips do not awaken and move around as much. So, the Pips, staying in one place most of the winter, collect the condensation. It is believed that they choose where they roost based on the humidity levels so they collect this condensation for proper hydration during hibernation.
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Postby MUD » Apr 8, 2007 3:37 pm

While caving today I saw something I've never seen before....a little brown bat was flying around and landed on the wall right beside a group of pippistrelles covered in dew. The little brown bat then began licking dew drops off the pippistrelle. What do you think of that? Guess they gotta get a drink from somewhere! :grin:
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Postby Komebeaux » Apr 8, 2007 5:15 pm

That is strange indeed. I've never heard of that, but you never know, the biologists out there may have observed it before.

You should check around and see if thats ever been reported before.
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