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PostPosted: Jun 21, 2007 1:33 pm
by YuccaPatrol
I finally found a couple sets of these batteries with the $5 rebate and bought them. (thanks werewolf for the tip on where to find them)

I immediately began testing using my MAHA MH-C9000 charger which allows for analyzing and reporting the true capacity of each battery independently.

The charger came with two 2100mAH AA batteries and two 800mAH AAA batteries. I bought two sets so that I would have 4 of each type of battery.

First I tested the capacity of the batteries which were charged by the factory before packaging. Then I put the batteries through several recharge/analyze cycles and discharge cycles to see if the batteries improved with several successive charge cycles.

All results will be reported in mAH as measured by the charger.

Initial capacity out of the box (discharge #1):

AA: 1758 1748 1631 1697

AAA: 616 606 634 632

First refresh/analyze cycle:

AA: 1992 1985 1960 1977

AAA: 771 770 769 779

Discharge #2

AA: 1951 2031 1992 1985

AAA: 778 774 781 791

Second refresh/analyze cycle:

AA: 1947 1964 1938 1954

AAA: 768 765 789 800

Discharge #3

AA: 1956 1982 1988 1999

AAA: 790 781 789 779


All in all, I am pleased with the initial performance of these batteries. Their capacity improved a bit with a few charging cycles (as it should) and all of the batteries have true capacities within 6% of their specification. Considering that most battery manufacturers exaggerate capacities by about 10%, this is very good.

The 800maH AAA batteries have an average capacity which is 98% of their specification. This is almost unheard of, and most battery manufacturers would have labeled them as 850 or 900maH batteries.

To test the long term ability of these batteries to hold a charge, I am storing these batteries for the next two months and will test 2 of each type at 1 month and 2 month intervals to gauge how well these batteries really do hold their charge over time.

Although these hybrid rechargeables do not yet have the capacity of the highest performing standard NiMH batteries, they will definitely fill a niche in my battery collection for the devices I rarely use but want to know will work when needed because I am too cheap to purchase disposable batteries for anything except a smoke detector or emergency flashlight in my glove box.

PostPosted: Jul 1, 2007 12:02 am
by werewolf
I think the sale on these great batteries is STILL going on at Walmart.

PostPosted: Jul 9, 2007 10:06 am
by YuccaPatrol
Yes, they still have those batteries with charger and rebate available at my local store.

I am waiting until the 21st of July to begin testing the batteries I have charged and stored to see if they really do keep their charge for a long time. Give me another 2 weeks or so and I'll report the results of additonal long term testing.

PostPosted: Jul 9, 2007 10:47 am
by hank moon
YuccaPatrol wrote:Yes, they still have those batteries with charger and rebate available at my local store.

I am waiting until the 21st of July to begin testing the batteries I have charged and stored to see if they really do keep their charge for a long time. Give me another 2 weeks or so and I'll report the results of additonal long term testing.


Hey, apart from expedition usage, what would be the interest for cavers in these batts? Just curious.

PostPosted: Jul 9, 2007 1:33 pm
by YuccaPatrol
Although I always carry freshly charged extra batteries while caving, I also keep a set of disposable alkaline batteries in my first aid kit for emergencies since I know that they will work even if stored for extended periods of time.

Now I can carry these batteries in my emergency kit and know they will be fully charged and still do my part for the environment by using rechargeables instead of disposables.

Now, the only use I have for disposable batteries are the 9-volt ones in my home smoke detectors. . . .

PostPosted: Jul 9, 2007 2:50 pm
by hank moon
Bravo! thanks for the info - might check into 'em. I usually just carry a spare set of freshly-charged NiMH but this model might be easier to work with...


YuccaPatrol wrote:Although I always carry freshly charged extra batteries while caving, I also keep a set of disposable alkaline batteries in my first aid kit for emergencies since I know that they will work even if stored for extended periods of time.

Now I can carry these batteries in my emergency kit and know they will be fully charged and still do my part for the environment by using rechargeables instead of disposables.

Now, the only use I have for disposable batteries are the 9-volt ones in my home smoke detectors. . . .

PostPosted: Jul 9, 2007 3:41 pm
by JoeyS
YuccaPatrol wrote:Now, the only use I have for disposable batteries are the 9-volt ones in my home smoke detectors. . . .


Yep. So you'll be alerted when the charger unit for your rechargeables catches fire and begins to burn the house down!
j/k
Hope that doesn't happen to anyone!

PostPosted: Jul 11, 2007 1:57 am
by werewolf
JoeyS wrote:
YuccaPatrol wrote:Now, the only use I have for disposable batteries are the 9-volt ones in my home smoke detectors. . . .


Yep. So you'll be alerted when the charger unit for your rechargeables catches fire and begins to burn the house down!
j/k
Hope that doesn't happen to anyone!




Has anything like that happened lately? I think I once heard about a fire getting started by a battery charger.